Chickasaw Cultural Center

Chickasaw Cultural Center 867 Charles Cooper Memorial Rd
Sulphur, OK 73086

Phone: 580-622-7130
Weather Forecast
H 94° L 71°
Description

The Chickasaw Cultural Center, located in south-central Oklahoma in the heart of the Chickasaw Nation, is a world-class museum complex devoted to the celebration of Chickasaw history and culture.  Using modern technology and richly theatrical environments, the Chickasaw Cultural Center will immerse visitors in the vibrant, ongoing story of the Chickasaws.  Located on 109 acres of rolling hills, woodlands and streams near Sulphur, this museum complex features more than 96,000 sq ft of indoor space, including an exhibit center, the Holisso Research Center and a large-format theatre.  An amphitheater, sky terrace, traditional village and several water features are also featured on the grounds of the Chickasaw Cultural Center.

The Chickasaw Cultural Center, located in south-central Oklahoma in the heart of the Chickasaw Nation, is a world-class museum complex devoted to the celebration of Chickasaw history and culture.  Using modern technology and richly theatrical environments, the Chickasaw Cultural Center will immerse visitors in the vibrant, ongoing story of the Chickasaws.  Located on 109 acres of rolling hills, woodlands and streams near Sulphur, this museum complex features more than 96,000 sq ft of indoor space, including an exhibit center, the Holisso Research Center and a large-format theatre.  An amphitheater, sky terrace, traditional village and several water features are also featured on the grounds of the Chickasaw Cultural Center.

Begin your journey in the Chikasha Poya Exhibit Center, where guests are invited to experience a 20-minute HD film in an orientation theater designed to resemble an 18th century, 1,200 sq ft council house.  As the film comes to close, the screen rises and visitors walk beneath a rock ledge and over a stream to the Spirit Forest, an interactive exhibit featuring native plants, animals, 60 sensors and 176 theatrical lights.  Exhibits on ancient ancestors, mounds and artifacts and the separation of the Chickasaw and Choctaw Nations are continued in separate galleries. 

Visitors will experience the removal of the Chickasaws to Indian Territory in a long corridor lined with sculptures of animals, people and vehicles.  Changes in light stimulate the changing seasons and recreate a moment in time during removal.  Text, photos and objects pertaining to pre-allotment and allotment periods will be interspersed throughout the exhibit galleries.  A variety of language learning stations are also featured, as well as a stomp dance gallery featuring holograms and a glowing campfire.

Visit the large-format Anoli' Theater and witness the story of the Chickasaws unfold on a 40' x 60' screen, or make your way to the Aaimpa Cafe for menu items inspired by traditional Chickasaw fare, such as pashofa, grape dumplings and Indian fry bread.  Venture outside and explore demonstration gardens and an educational village featuring a number of traditional Chickasaw dwellings.  Throughout the Chickasaw Cultural Center, visitors will be encouraged to explore important aspects of Chickasaw life, including nature, spirituality, family, learning and law through a variety of exhibits as well as human storytellers and guides.

Property Map
Get Directions
Sorry, but we couldn't locate any properties
Amenities
Hours
Directions
Contact Information
  • Discounts: Senior Discount

  • Facility Amenities: ADA Compliant, Credit Cards Accepted, Gift Shop, Handicapped Parking, Meeting Space Available, Restaurant on site

  • Group Amenities: Accommodates Tour Groups, Bus/Motorcoach Parking, Complimentary Attraction Passes for Guide/Driver, Group Rates Available

  • Suitable for Ages: Adults (18+), Children (up to 12), Teens (13-18)

  • Tour Information: Customized tours, Group Tours, Guided Tours, Self-guided tours

Day

Open

Close

Sunday

12:00 pm

4:00 pm

Tuesday

10:00 am

5:00 pm

Wednesday

10:00 am

5:00 pm

Thursday

10:00 am

5:00 pm

Friday

10:00 am

5:00 pm

Saturday

10:00 am

5:00 pm

From I-35, take Davis exit (Exit 55). Head east 10 miles and turn right (south) on Charles Cooper Memorial Rd. Complex located 1 mile south on the left (east) side of the road.

Primary Contact:

Paige Williams

Event Contact:

Terrie Woods




  • your name:

  • your email address:

  • friend's name:

  • friend's email address:

  • comment:

  • send

4 comments

Rate this property:

  • name:
  • email address:
  • comment:
From Kathryn Sullivan on 07/28/14

Stunning facility....our family just returned from a day at the Chickasaw Culture Center and are still talking about the people, the food, the grounds, the education we got there and we will be going back.


From owner on 06/25/13

When Frontier City originally opened in 1958 at the Oklahoma State Fair and then moved to the current location a couple of years later. There was an Indian Village component to Frontier City. Additionally, there were trading posts along the Turner Turnpike that existed and thrived during that time; however, none that existed right where I35 and the Turner Turnpike intersect. Frontier City is still open seasonally; however, no longer includes an Indian Village. Additionally, another notable Indian trading post was the following; however, it is about 20 minutes west of Frontier City. Indian Territory – Cherokee Trading Post. Between I-40 and Route 66, west of El Reno, stands the Cherokee Trading Post, which is much more than a run-of-the-mill truck stop. Billboards tout buffalo burgers and pies at its restaurant, the complex sports a huge mural recounting the history of Native Americans in Oklahoma (plus several statues and totem poles) and a couple of live bison lounge in a pen nearby. In a large gallery building shaped roughly like three teepees, you’ll see thousands of pieces of American Indian and Western art, crafts and toys. It’s a place where you can buy authentic steer horns or children’s coyote socks.


From Rykie Seyerle on 06/22/13

As a kid I remember that, but I don't think it is there anymore. Don't even think Frontier City is still there I went there as a kid as well.


From jik on 06/20/13

does anyone remember a motel in the 1950's /60's on or near the turner turnpike in Oklahoma city called indian village? it had a landing strip for airplanes as well as a restaurant with a very fancy silver decorated saddle on display. I was wondering where exactly it was located as well as if its still there.


 
4
Get Social
Read Related Articles
An authentic stagecoach stands on the grounds of the Hitching Post Ranch in Kenton.  Guests can stay at the ranch and help with cattle round-ups, branding and ranch chores, or just relax and enjoy horseback riding and the outdoors.Oklahoma A to Z

Explore the great state of Oklahoma from A to Z by following our insider recommendations for attractions, destinations and things to do, conveniently organized in a handy alphabetical list that highlights the state’s popular treasures.

The monumental "End of the Trail" sculpture by James Earle Fraser is perfectly framed near the entrance of the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City.An Oklahoma Thanksgiving: Things to Do with Family Over the Holidays

Showcase Oklahoma’s diversity and charm for out-of-town visitors with visits to the state’s top attractions, Thanksgiving-themed food and treats, and some of the best Black Friday shopping destinations.

This sculpture is part of the collections on exhibit at the Gilcrease Museum in Tulsa.  The Gilcrease Museum houses the world's largest and most comprehensive collection of art and artifacts of the American West, as well as an unparalleled collection of American Indian art and artifacts.Top Native American Attractions in Oklahoma

Experience sacred American Indian traditions and view authentic cultural displays at top Native American museums, cultural centers and attractions in Oklahoma.

A replica of the Winnie Mae airplane piloted by Wiley Post is suspended in the rotunda of the Oklahoma History Center above a view of the state capitol building.Oklahoma's Top Tier Museums

Explore this list of the finest museums in Oklahoma and unearth a world filled with history, art and culture.

Every twist and turn of the Talimena National Scenic Byway in southeastern Oklahoma offers travelers a new vantage point over miles and miles of forested ridges and valleys.48-Hour Fall Getaways in Oklahoma

Celebrate cooler temperatures with one of these three 48-hour getaways to Oklahoma’s top fall foliage hotspots.

Enjoy cool, crisp slices of watermelon at the Watermelon Festival & Community Fair in Ringwood to celebrate Labor Day.Oklahoma Travel Picks: Labor Day Trip Ideas

Celebrate the extended weekend with refreshing, end-of-summer festivals and cool things to do this Labor Day in Oklahoma.

Lt. Col. George Armstrong Custer led troops during an 1868 dawn surprise attack on the village of Cheyenne Peace Chief Black Kettle on the banks of the Washita River in what is now western Oklahoma.  The historic massacre is interpreted at the Washita Battlefield National Historic Site in Cheyenne.  Photo courtesy of the Oklahoma Historical Society.Oklahoma Through the Ages

Embark on a rousing journey through Oklahoma’s unique history and discover everything from prehistoric gems to Art Deco giants with this list of top historical attractions organized by era.

A Chickasaw re-enactor demonstrates archery techniques at the Chickasaw Cultural Center in Sulphur.Murray County Genealogy Resources

Discover Murray County and trace your family history and ancestry with this list of county-specific genealogy resources.

The Standing Bear Museum in Ponca City houses artifacts and artwork from the tribes of the area.Road Trip: American Indian Heritage

Discover the rich culture and heritage of America's original people by taking a road trip into Oklahoma's American Indian Country.

Oklahoma has been home to American Indian peoples for 30,000 years.  You can explore the many native cultures that now call Oklahoma home at museums, attractions and American Indian events across the state.Oklahoma's Rich Indian History

Discover the rich history of Oklahoma's Indian people and cultures and find attractions throughout the state where you can explore our American Indian history further.

The Bricktown Canal is all decked out in stunning Christmas lights for the Downtown in December holiday celebration each year.  Take a ride on the water taxis and tour the well-decorated Bricktown Entertainment District in downtown Oklahoma City.Winter Break Ideas

Oklahoma’s winter playground is filled with enchanting activities ideal for the holiday season, whether entertaining guests or creating new family traditions. From outdoor ice skating to indoor relaxation, Oklahoma is gearing up for a holiday season you and your family won’t soon forget.

Mist enshrouds the hills of Beavers Bend State Park in Broken Bow creating spectacular scenery on a fall day.Best Bets for Oklahoma Fall Foliage

The magical autumn season conjures visions of warm sweaters, crisp air and the vibrant hues of fall foliage. Discover six foliage drives in Oklahoma where you can watch the landscape explode with vivid autumn colors as you venture down winding roads chasing the breathtaking scenery beyond.

Traditional American Indian regalia is worn by dancers at the Standing Bear Powwow in Ponca City.One State, Many Nations in Oklahoma's Indian Country

More than 90 Native American attractions, museums and shopping destinations await you in Oklahoma. As you explore them, you’ll learn about Native American people, their past, present and future.

Follow This Listing