Fort Sill National Historic Landmark & Museum

Fort Sill National Historic Landmark & Museum 435 Quanah Rd
Fort Sill, OK 73503

Phone: 580-442-5123
Fax: 580-442-8120
Description

The Fort Sill National Historic Landmark & Museum is a 19th century frontier army post consisting of approximately 50 buildings and the grounds surrounding them.  Fort Sill is perhaps best known as the home of Geronimo during his later years and is also an operating Army military base. 

Fort Sill was founded by General Philip Sheridan during a winter campaign against the Southern Plains tribes in 1869.  The renowned Buffalo Soldiers were stationed at Fort Sill in the 1870s and provided major assistance in the construction of the post.  This African-American regiment was given their nickname by the Indian tribes they fought in honor of their fierceness in battle.  In 1911, Ft. Sill became the home of the U.S. Field Artillery Center and School. Today, the U.S. Field Artillery Museum showcases the history of the cadets who have honed their artillery skills at Fort Sill over the course of a century. 

The Fort Sill National Historic Landmark & Museum is a 19th century frontier army post consisting of approximately 50 buildings and the grounds surrounding them.  Fort Sill is perhaps best known as the home of Geronimo during his later years and is also an operating Army military base. 

Fort Sill was founded by General Philip Sheridan during a winter campaign against the Southern Plains tribes in 1869.  The renowned Buffalo Soldiers were stationed at Fort Sill in the 1870s and provided major assistance in the construction of the post.  This African-American regiment was given their nickname by the Indian tribes they fought in honor of their fierceness in battle.  In 1911, Ft. Sill became the home of the U.S. Field Artillery Center and School. Today, the U.S. Field Artillery Museum showcases the history of the cadets who have honed their artillery skills at Fort Sill over the course of a century. 

Forty-six of the original Fort Sill structures are still in use and in mint condition. The Post Quadrangle features historic homes, museum buildings and the Post Chapel. The museum's visitor center is located at the southeast corner of the quadrangle. The Quartermaster Corral was built in 1870 to protect livestock after a Kiowa horse stealing raid.

Contrary to popular belief, Geronimo was not imprisoned at Fort Sill for more than a few brief stints.  The great Apache warrior did live out his final years on the grounds of the fort and it is his final resting place.  In addition to Geronimo, Native American notables including Quanah Parker are buried at Chief's Knoll in the Post Cemetery. 

Self guided tours are available with the use of an audio guide or brochure, although all visitors are required to get a background check through the on-site Visitors Control Center prior to admission onto the base.

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  • Facility Amenities: Credit Cards Accepted, Gift Shop, Handicapped Parking

  • General Information: Free admission

  • Group Amenities: Bus/Motorcoach Parking

  • Highway Corridors (within 5 mi.): I-44

  • Suitable for Ages: Adults (18+), Children (up to 12), Teens (13-18)

  • Tour Information: Self-guided tours

Day

Open

Close

Tuesday

9:00 am

5:00 pm

Wednesday

9:00 am

5:00 pm

Thursday

9:00 am

5:00 pm

Friday

9:00 am

5:00 pm

Saturday

9:00 am

5:00 pm

Bus tours should give a two or three week advanced notice of their arrival.

From Lawton, take Sheridan Road North to enter Fort Sill at Bentley Gate. After passing through Bentley Gate, proceed on Sheridan Road until Randolph Road (you will pass Geronimo stop light). Turn left onto Randolph Road, before Key Gate, and continue up the hill until Chickasha Road. Turn right onto Chickasha and then immediate left onto Quanah Road. Museum Visitor Center is on the left - Building 435.

From I-44, take Rogers Lane (Route 62) to Sheridan Road North. After passing through Bentley Gate, proceed on Sheridan Road until Randolph Road (you will pass Geronimo stop light). Turn left onto Randolph Road, before Key Gate, and continue up the hill until Chickasha Road. Turn right onto Chickasha and then immediate left onto Quanah Road. Museum Visitor Center is on the left - Building 435.

Primary Contact:

Scott Neel




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From TravelOK.com Staff on 07/06/15

Edward, for that information your best bet is to call the Fort Sill National Historic Landmark & Museum directly at 580-442-5123. Thank you for using TravelOK.com!


From edward on 07/04/15

hi am curious if you have any art work by julia thecla?


From Marion Stade on 06/25/15

Unfortunately I pushed the wrong button on my cell and lost the name of the person to contact. Is there a way to get in touch with the Gentle Tamers?


From owner on 06/25/15

Unfortunately things have changed. We are no longer able to give non-military tours due to lack of staff. We do have an audio tour that is available and you can get the brochure either at our Visitor Center or from our website. Thank you.


From Marion Stade on 06/25/15

Would you know if there is a self guided tour map or a way to receive a tour of the historical museums and parts of the base?


From Stephen Mandel on 06/23/15

I was stationed at Fort Sill twice, fifty years ago. Once for advanced training and the second time as permanent party assigned to Finance. The wildness reserve was spectactular close to the Fort. Geronimo's grave was hard to find as his grave and his many wife's graves was by a highway with no marking at the site at that time. I trust that has changed. The people of Oklahoma were very kind. I enjoyed my time there.


From owner on 01/29/15

Gramps, Good morning. Please go to our website - http://sill-www.army.mil/museum and under About Us / Collections / Research there is a link for an Information Request Form. Please fill that out and send to us and we will see what we have in our Archives. If you have any questions, please feel free to call 580-442-5123. Thank you for your interest.


From Gramps on 01/29/15

Back in the '60's there was a round horse training pen somewhere just south of the railroad tracks and I'm looking for pictures of that facility, which is no longer there. Thank you.


From Sherry on 10/12/14

I loved it! Very informative


From TravelOK.com Staff on 08/11/14

Almeda, we're not sure who told you the cemetery may not be open for visitors, but according to the Fort Sill National Cemetery website, it is open daily from 7am-6pm. For more information, please call 580-492-3200 or 580-492-3201. Best wishes and thank you for using TravelOK.com!


From Almeda Whipple on 08/09/14

Is the general public still allowed to visit the Apache Cemetery? I was told maybe not. Thanks.


From owner on 04/07/14

Yvan Jayne, Good morning. Yes, the Fort Sill National Historic Landmark and Museum are open to the public. Anyone over the age of 16 must have valid photo identification to come on post. They will be required to show it to the guard at the gate. Thank you for your interest.


From TravelOK.com Staff on 04/07/14

Yvan Jayne, all of the Fort Still National Historic Landmark areas and the museum are open to the public. Best wishes and thank you for using TravelOK.com!


From Yvan Jayne on 04/06/14

I was told that non Americans cannot enter the base to visit museum. Is that true?


From augustus on 03/01/14

i have an old fort sill artillary photo album, it has photos of col. charles douglas herron, maj. george m peek, and i will be visiting soon!


From owner on 08/12/13

D Aker, thank you for your comment. The primary focus of the Fort Sill National Historic Landmark and Museum is the Frontier Army and the local Native American Tribes. We do cover up to 1920 with the establishment and subsequent transfer of the Army Aviation to Fort Rucker and do have the 1st Field Artillery School of Fire. The part of Fort Sill history that you are referring to is most probably covered down at the US Army Field Artillery Museum.


From D aker on 08/11/13

I see nothing about the National Guard troops there from KS, MO and others besides the artillery units in 1918 from which they went East and to war.


From owner on 03/27/13

Ms. Selders, Please call our Archivist at 580-442-5224 to discuss this photo book. He will probably ask that you send some photographs of the book so he can evaluate it. We do not accept any donations without first evaluating them and how they fit into our mission / collections. Thank you for your comment and if you have any questions, please call our main number at 580-442-5123.


From connie selders on 03/26/13

I have a 1918 photo book of Ft Sill that was kept by my mother in law there are pictures of men and the buildings as well as the weapons used I would like to see it put to good use.... if you are interested I could bring it to you or mail it... thank you, connie selders


From TravelOK.com Staff on 12/19/12

Wally, please call the museum directly at 580-442-5123 and they will be able to give you more information. Best wishes and thank you for using TravelOK.com!


From wally dier on 12/18/12

Is Geronimo's rifle at this location?? I have what I think is Scout Martines rifle, they should be togather


From TravelOK.com Staff on 10/05/12

Morris, what a great photo! Please call the museum directly at 580-442-5123 as they will not accept donations without prior communication. Best wishes and thank you for using TravelOK.com!


From Morris L. Fugitt on 10/04/12

I currently have a photo of a company of Buffalo Soldiers Circa Oct 1940. It was taken by the post studio. My father is one of the officers. I would like to donate it to the museum. Please let me know where to send it. Morris Fugitt


From TINA KOHR on 01/13/12

I Lived in Fort Sill 15yrs. because my father was in the army and we lived there for 15 years. i really loved it out there.


From Glenda Galvan on 09/29/11

I very much enjoy visiting the Fort sill museum sites because it interprets local history from various perspectives such as tribal, military, locals and government. Very well maintained and good publicity venues.


 
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