TAHLEQUAH, Okla., (April 6, 2011) --- The Cherokee Heritage Center will present the 40th Annual Trail of Tears Art Show and Sale from April 9-May 8, featuring authentic Native American art in one of Oklahoma’s oldest art shows. The Cherokee Heritage Center is located at 21192 S. Keeler Drive, Park Hill, OK 74451.

Native American citizens from federally recognized tribes are set to showcase their art and compete for $10,000 in several divisions and categories including painting, sculpture, pottery, basketry, graphics and miniatures. A special Trail of Tears theme category and a jewelry category will be featured for the first time. Bank of Oklahoma and the Chickasaw Nation sponsor the 40th Annual Trail of Tears Art Show and Sale.

This year’s show is expected to draw more than 4,000 attendees from around the world and will feature more than 150 Native American artists.

 “The Trail of Tears Art Show has been around since 1972 and continues to grow,” said Carey Tilley, Executive Director at the Cherokee Heritage Center. “We are especially excited to provide an opportunity for prominent Cherokee artists to compete alongside leading Native American artists from across the nation.”

The 2010 Grand Prize winner of the Trail of Tears Art Show was Norma Howard, (Choctaw), for her untitled acrylic in the miniature category. Additional past winners include:

 
- Sharon Irla (Cherokee), 2010, 1st place in painting category, “Beloved Woman of the Cherokee - Noayehi” Oils.
 
- Bill Glass Jr. & Demos Glass (Cherokee), 2010, 1st place in sculpture category, “Warriors Sculpture” Mixed Media.
 
- Dorothy Sullivan (Cherokee), 2009, 1st place in Trail of Tears category, “My Heart is on this Ground” Acrylic.
 
- Chris Pappan (Kaw Nation), 2009, 3rd place in graphics category, “Untitled, 21st Century Ledger Drawing” Graphite.
 
 
The Trail of Tears Art Show at the Cherokee Heritage Center is symbolic on two fronts. First in stature, as the show is the first exhibition held at the facility. It’s also historically symbolic, as the National Park Service has designated the center as the interpretive site for the end of the Trail Of Tears. Tens of thousands of Cherokees and other tribes were forcibly removed to Indian Territory, now Oklahoma, during the 1800s.

“Through the years the categories of the show have evolved but one consistent feature has been the ‘Trail of Tears’ category. It is particularly powerful to see how artists capture the emotions of such a tumultuous event through their art,” added Tilley.

The Cherokee Heritage Center is open February through April, Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; May through Labor Day, daily, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and September 6 through December, Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Admission is $8.50 per adult, $7.50 per senior (55 and older) and students with proper identification, and $5 per child. Admission price includes all attractions. Entry to the grounds and museum store are free.

For additional information on the 2011 season and programs, please contact the Cherokee Heritage Center at (888) 999-6007, email at info@cherokeeheritage.org or visit http://www.CherokeeHeritage.org.

 
 
About Cherokee Heritage Center
The Cherokee Heritage Center, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, is the premier cultural center for Cherokee tribal history, culture, and the arts. Located in the heart of the Cherokee Nation in Tahlequah, Okla., it was established in 1963 by the Cherokee National Historical Society to preserve and promote the Cherokee culture. The Cherokee Heritage Center is also home to the Cherokee National Archives, which is the Nation’s foremost collection of historic tribal related documents and artifacts from the 1700s through present day. The Cherokee Heritage Center is situated on the grounds of the original Cherokee Female Seminary, which is one of the first institutions of higher learning for women west of the Mississippi and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The National Park Service has designated the Center as the interpretive site for the western terminus of the Trail Of Tears for the Cherokees and other tribes forcibly removed to Indian Territory, now Oklahoma, during the 1800s. For more information, please visit http://www.CherokeeHeritage.org.
 

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