TAHLEQUAH, Okla., (October 21, 2011) --- Cherokee Nation officials today celebrated the grand opening of the John Ross Museum. The museum highlights the life of John Ross, Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation for more than 38 years and houses exhibits and interactive displays on the Trail of Tears, Civil War, Cherokee Golden Age and Cherokee Nation’s passion for the education of its people. The museum also has a small gift shop and research area.

The John Ross Museum is now the second Cherokee Nation wholly owned and operated museum following the dedication of the Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum in 2010. The Cherokee National Prison Museum will become the third such museum when it opens in Spring 2012.

“With the John Ross Museum and through our restoration projects and cultural tourism program we are able to honor our heritage and provide opportunities for the Cherokee people,” said Molly Jarvis, vice president of Cultural Tourism at Cherokee Nation Entertainment. “It is an honor for me to join our community to recognize Principal Chief John Ross, a great tribal leader, who served as chief of the Cherokee Nation for more than 38 years. Chief John Ross is one of our most revered historical figures, leading the Cherokee people through forced removal known as the Trail of Tears and the Civil War years.”

The new John Ross Museum is located adjacent to Ross Cemetery in former Rural School #51 near Park Hill, Okla. The museum was originally built in 1913 to operate as a rural school in Cherokee County just after Oklahoma statehood. The school served Cherokee and non-Cherokee students and the facility remained open through the 1950s.
 
An extension of the recently completed Ross Cemetery restoration project, the John Ross Museum now acts as a gateway to Ross Cemetery and serves as a historical site highlighting the extraordinary life and accomplishments of John Ross. Additional exhibits will center on local interests and history of the surrounding area.

Guests joining the John Ross Museum dedication also enjoyed a special History After Dark preview that featured an interpretive actor portraying a notable figure from Cherokee history.

Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism presents the 3rd Annual History After Dark, interactive guided historical tours of the John Ross Museum, Owen School and Park Hill, with a unique Civil War perspective. The tours take place on Oct. 21–22 from the Cherokee Heritage Center and run every 30 minutes from 6-10 p.m. with the last tour departing at 9:30 p.m.

The John Ross Museum is a welcome addition to the Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism’s wide array of historic sites, museums and special events.

The John Ross Museum is located at 22366 S. 530 Rd, Park Hill, OK 74451. The museum is open Tuesday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is adults $3, seniors $2, students $2, and children under 5 free.

For information and/or tickets for the John Ross Museum and the 3rd Annual History After Dark, please call (877) 779-6977 or visit CherokeeTourismOK.com.


About Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism Group
The Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism Group is managed by Cherokee Nation Entertainment and was created in 2007 to preserve and promote the history and culture of the Cherokee people. Efforts by the Cherokee Nation include developing guided community and educational tours, creating tourism partnerships and programs throughout northeastern Oklahoma, and launching a new Cherokee tourism-specific website. For more information, please visit http://www.CherokeeTourismOK.com.

About Cherokee Nation Entertainment
Cherokee Nation Entertainment is the gaming, hospitality, retail and tourism entity of the Cherokee Nation. Cherokee Nation Entertainment operates Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Tulsa, seven Cherokee Casinos, four hotels, two golf courses and many other retail operations in northeastern Oklahoma. For more information, please visit http://www.CherokeeStarRewards.com.
 
About Cherokee Nation
The Cherokee Nation is the sovereign operating government of the Cherokee people.  It is a federally recognized tribe of more than 300,000 Cherokee citizens, with its capital located in Tahlequah, Okla. Employing more than 8,200 people, Cherokee Nation’s annual economic impact in Oklahoma and surrounding areas is more than $1.3 billion. To learn more, please visit http://www.cherokee.org.
 
 
 

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Cherokee Nation John Ross Museum Ribbon Cutting – Photo One Caption

Cherokee Nation officials formally opened the John Ross Museum on Oct. 21, 2011, in Park Hill, Okla. The ribbon-cutting ceremony was led by Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation Bill John Baker (center) and members of the Ross family. The museum highlights the life of John Ross, Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation for more than 38 years and houses exhibits and interactive displays on the Trail of Tears, Civil War, Cherokee Golden Age and Cherokee Nation’s passion for the education of its people. The museum also has a small gift shop and research area. The new John Ross Museum is located adjacent to Ross Cemetery in former Rural School #51 and was originally built in 1913 to operate as a rural school in Cherokee County just after Oklahoma statehood. The school served Cherokee and non-Cherokee students and the facility remained open through the 1950s. The John Ross Museum is now the second Cherokee Nation wholly owned and operated museum following the dedication of the Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum in 2010. The Cherokee National Prison Museum will become the third such museum when it opens in Spring 2012. (Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism Photo)
 
 
 
Cherokee Nation John Ross Museum Dedication  – Photos Two and Three Caption

Cherokee Nation officials formally opened the John Ross Museum on Oct. 21, 2011, in Park Hill, Okla. The museum highlights the life of John Ross, Principal Chief of the Cherokee Nation for more than 38 years and houses exhibits and interactive displays on the Trail of Tears, Civil War, Cherokee Golden Age and Cherokee Nation’s passion for the education of its people. The museum also has a small gift shop and research area. The new John Ross Museum is located adjacent to Ross Cemetery in former Rural School #51 and was originally built in 1913 to operate as a rural school in Cherokee County just after Oklahoma statehood. The school served Cherokee and non-Cherokee students and the facility remained open through the 1950s. The John Ross Museum is now the second Cherokee Nation wholly owned and operated museum following the dedication of the Cherokee National Supreme Court Museum in 2010. The Cherokee National Prison Museum will become the third such museum when it opens in Spring 2012. (Cherokee Nation Cultural Tourism Photo)
 

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Cameron Andrews
Pier Communications
562-432-5300

Ben Elder
Cherokee Nation Entertainment
918-384-5853