Red Slough Wildlife Management Area

Ouachita National Forest
Idabel, OK 74728

Red Slough Wildlife Management Area

Address:
Ouachita National Forest
Idabel, OK 74728
Phone:
580-494-6402
Office Fax:
580-494-6406

The Red Slough Wildlife Management Area is a premier watchable wildlife area in southeastern Oklahoma's Ouachita National Forest. The diversity of this area is astounding, which includes 322 bird species, 88 species of butterflies, 88 species of dragonflies/damselflies, and 58 species of reptiles and amphibians. Red Slough consists of 5,814 acres of marshes, wetlands, lakes, shrub/scrub, and forestland. There are nine observation platforms and five main parking lots from which to access the area. No motorized vehicles are allowed on the area.   

Unique species such as the roseate spoonbill, purple gallinule, white ibis, wood stork, yellow rail and black-bellied whistling duck have brought visitors from several states and countries to the slough. Waterfowl hunting is also popular during the winter months, as thousands of ducks converge on Red Slough. Mallards, teal, gadwalls and pintails are the most common waterfowl species harvested. A waterfowl refuge area has been established around five major reservoirs and no entrance is allowed between October 15 and January 31.

The American alligator also has a presence at the Red Slough Wildlife Management Area, and the prime season for activity is March through October. It is a breeding population with many nests found each year. 

Additional history, management regime, rules and regulations for visitors can be found on the website and in the Oklahoma Hunting Regulation Guide. The area is managed by the U.S. Forest Service, Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation and the Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Photos

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Amenities

Hours

Sunday: Open 24 hours
Monday: Open 24 hours
Tuesday: Open 24 hours
Wednesday: Open 24 hours
Thursday: Open 24 hours
Friday: Open 24 hours
Saturday: Open 24 hours
A waterfowl refuge area has been established around five major reservoirs and no entrance is allowed between October 15 and January 31.
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