Spiro Mounds Archaeological Center

Spiro Mounds Archaeological Center 18154 1st St
Spiro, OK 74959

Phone: 918-962-2062
Fax: 918-962-2062
Description

The Spiro Mounds Archaeological Center is the only prehistoric Native American archaeological site in Oklahoma open to the public.  One of the most important American Indian sites in the nation, the Spiro Mounds are world renowned because of the incredible amount of art and artifacts dug from the Craig Mound, the site's only burial mound.  Home to rich cultural resources, the Spiro Mounds were created and used by Caddoan speaking Indians between 850 and 1450 AD.  This area of eastern Oklahoma became the seat of ancient Mississippian culture and the Spiro Mounds grew from a small farming village to one of the most important cultural centers in what later became the United States.

The Spiro Mounds Archaeological Center is the only prehistoric Native American archaeological site in Oklahoma open to the public.  One of the most important American Indian sites in the nation, the Spiro Mounds are world renowned because of the incredible amount of art and artifacts dug from the Craig Mound, the site's only burial mound.  Home to rich cultural resources, the Spiro Mounds were created and used by Caddoan speaking Indians between 850 and 1450 AD.  This area of eastern Oklahoma became the seat of ancient Mississippian culture and the Spiro Mounds grew from a small farming village to one of the most important cultural centers in what later became the United States.

The twelve mounds became a supreme regional power with ceremonial areas and a support city.  The Spiro people created an extremely sophisticated culture and went on to influence the entire southeast region.  The Spiro Mounds were home to an extensive trade network, a working political system and a highly developed religious center.  The mounds themselves were constructed in layers from basket loads of dirt.  The Spiro Mounds site features one burial mound, two temple mounds and nine house mounds.

Today, the Spiro Mounds site is situated on 150 acres of protected land that encompasses the twelve original mounds, the village area and sections of the ancient support city.  The mounds have been excavated over the years and have produced a wide range of art and artifacts including religious and ornamental objects.  Dubbed the "King Tut of the Arkansas Valley" by the Kansas City Star in 1935, the Spiro Mounds have yielded elaborate ceremonial grave goods including basketry, feather capes and cloth.  Based on these historic finds, the Spiro Mounds have been hailed as home to the most elaborate, artistic and sophisticated decoration of any other Mississippian site. 

The Spiro Mounds Archaeological Center features a wide variety of interpretive exhibits, an introductory slide program and a gift shop.  Visitors to the Spiro Mounds will enjoy nearly two miles of interpretive trails, including a one-half mile nature trail.  An archaeologist is on staff to answer questions and lead tours.  Don't miss the special tours of the site held during the annual solstices and equinoxes. 

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Contact Information
  • Facility Amenities: Gift Shop

  • Tour Information: Guided Tours

Day

Open

Close

Sunday

12:00 pm

5:00 pm

Wednesday

9:00 am

5:00 pm

Thursday

9:00 am

5:00 pm

Friday

9:00 am

5:00 pm

Saturday

9:00 am

5:00 pm

Closed state holidays.

Located 3 miles E of Spiro on Hwy 9/271 and 4 miles N on Lock & Dam Rd.

Primary Contact:

Dennis Peterson




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From TravelOK.com Staff on 04/13/15

Geri, their official website (orange button at the top of this page) doesn't mention pets, so your best bet is to call 918-962-2062 before your visit. Have a great day and thank you for using TravelOK.com!


From Geri Lea on 04/09/15

Are pets allowed on the property?


From TravelOK.com Staff on 03/04/15

Trena, thanks for your interest in Spiro Mounds! The staff there will be more than happy to answer any questions you have and schedule your visit. Please give them a call at 918-962-2062. Have a great day and thank you for using TravelOK.com!


From Trena Davis on 03/04/15

I am interested in bringing our little school but need details please. We would have about 35 people ages 5-14 and some adults.


From Hunter on 02/13/14

THIS IS AWESOME!!!!!!!


From Jacque Callaway on 06/30/13

I recently took my two sons-4&7-to Spiro for the Summer solstice walk and they can't wait to go back! It is an amazing place to appreciate the people who were here before us and their way of life. The tour was interesting and the archaeologist who gives the tour is amazing. It is a small drive for a great history trip and I am sure we will be back for the Autumn equinox walk!


From TravelOK.com Staff on 06/10/13

Melissa, please contact Spiro Mounds Archaeological Center using the information above. Best wishes and thank you for using TravelOK.com!


From melissa edwards on 06/09/13

my son needs to spend 8 hours either digging in a site or helping cleaning up stuff that had been in a site. can you help me out here and let me know where we might be able to get this done. it is a boy scout merit badge. thanks


From Gegi on 02/24/13

Why wasn't this taught in American history


From Tim Robbins on 10/09/11

It was my first visit to the park today. I enjoyed my visit. It was relaxing and well worth the time spent there. I was amazed by how much I learned form my visit. Definitely a great place to stop and visit.


From Eric on 02/01/10

Surprisingly, there's a lot more history in this park that most would imagine. From Spanish gold to tomb robbers, and of course the Caddo Indian, this site has been through it all. I've been there numerous times, and each time I go back I'm amazed at how intelligent and advanced these people were.


 
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